Controlling a Slice of Pi/O with Python

I recently got a comment on my article from 1st February about Soldering a Slice of Pi/O asking for some help in programming it in Python. This reminded me that I have not got very far with this little board beyond checking that the Raspberry Pi could see it. So I decided to see what …

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Testing memory-mapped IO

Following on from yesterday’s post about developing code which uses the memory-mapped IO on the Raspberry Pi, but on a separate development system which does not have the same hardware, I began to think about the steps needed for testing such code. The first stage is unit-level testing. As much of the code as possible …

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Hardware abstraction layers

I feel as though I have been spending most of my CORNELIUS efforts on the ELIUS (language) part, and neglecting the CORN (operating system) part. Recently, though, I have been thinking about the notion of a “hardware abstraction layer” (HAL). This is a common part of many systems, and serves to isolate the messy, hardware-specific …

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Soldering a slice of pi/o

A few weeks ago I bought some interface adapter boards, including a Slice of PI/O, which came as a kit of parts in a little zip-lock bag. I had a day off work today. Not for a good reason, unfortunately – it was my aunt’s funeral in the afternoon. But it did give me an …

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Fitting a Real Time Clock to Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi is a great little board, and it still amazes me the huge range of things you can do with it. However, it’s not without its limitations. One of these limitations is that it has no “real-time” clock. Sure, it has internal counters and the like, and when running under Linux it will …

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